• +011-47252025

    +011-47252075

Contact Info


  •   +011-47252025, 47252075 (centralised)

  •   info@cityimaging.in

  • Tilak Nagar 

    4b/18 Near Haldiram Sweets, Tilak Nagar, Opposite to Metro Pillar Number 492, New Delhi - 110018

  • Janakpuri 

    90, Block C3, Janakpuri, New Delhi - 110058
    01142143291

  • Pashchim Vihar 

    A2/7 Ground floor, Prateek Apartment, Paschim Vihar, New Delhi-110063

  • Najafgarh 

    Near, Property No 13,14,15 Raghubir Enclave Chhotu Ram Market, Nangloi - Najafgarh Rd, Najafgarh, Lokesh Park, Delhi, 110043

  • Palam 

    RZ-1B Puran Nagar, Raj Nagar, New Delhi -110045
    08800799544

What is an X-ray

An X-ray is a common imaging test that’s been used for decades. It can help your doctor view the inside of your body without having to make an incision. This can help them diagnose, monitor, and treat many medical conditions.

Why is an X-ray performed

Your doctor may order an X-ray to:

  • Examine an area where you’re experiencing pain or discomfort
  • Monitor the progression of a diagnosed disease, such as osteoporosis
  • Check how well a prescribed treatment is working

How should you prepare for an X-ray?

X-rays are standard procedures. In most cases, you won’t need to take special steps to prepare for them. Depending on the area that your doctor and radiologist are examining, you may want to wear loose, comfortable clothing that you can easily move around in. They may ask you to change into a hospital gown for the test. They may also ask you to remove any jewelry or other metallic items from your body before your X-ray is taken.

How is the procedure performed?

An X-ray technologist or radiologist can perform an X-ray in a hospital’s radiology department, a dentist’s office, or a clinic that specializes in diagnostic procedures.

What are the potential side effects of an X-Ray?

X-rays use small amounts of radiation to create images of your body. The level of radiation exposure is considered safe for most adults, but not for a developing baby. If you’re pregnant or believe you could be pregnant, tell your doctor before you have an X-ray. They may suggest a different imaging method, such as an MRI.

What happens after an X-ray?

After your X-ray images have been collected, you can change back into your regular clothes. Depending on your condition, your doctor may advise you to go about your normal activities or rest while you’re waiting for your results. Your results may be available on the same day as your procedure, or later.

Uses of X-Rays

Plain x-rays are typically the first imaging test done to evaluate the arms, legs, or chest and sometimes the spine and abdomen. These body parts contain important structures with very different densities that are easily distinguished on x-rays. Thus, plain x-rays are used to detect the following:

  • Fractures: The almost white bone contrasts clearly with the gray muscles around it.
  • Pneumonia: The black air in the lungs contrasts clearly with the white infected tissues, which block more of the x-rays.
  • Blockages of the intestine: The black air in the blocked intestine contrasts clearly with the gray surrounding tissues.

Preparation:

  • Patients 70 years old and up, patients with high blood pressure or known renal disease will need a lab test to determine their creatinine level.
  • Nothing to eat 4 hours prior to exam time
  • Clear liquids up to 2 hours prior to exam time
  • Continue to take all routine medications

Barium Swallow (BA Swallow) Preparation:

There is no preparation for this procedure

Upper Gastro Intestinal Tract (UGI) Preparation:

  • Nothing to eat or drink after midnight
  • Continue to take all routine medications with a little water
  • No water 30 minutes before exam

Small Bowel Follow Through (SBFT) Preparation:

  • Nothing to eat or drink after midnight
  • Continue to take all routine medications with a little water
  • Be prepared to be at the hospital a minimum of 2-3 hours

Barium Enema (BE) - Images the Colon or Large Intestine Preparation:

  • Revised info
  • Nothing to eat or drink after midnight
  • Continue to take all routine medications with a little water

Voiding Cysto Urethrogram (VCUG) images the bladder preparation:

  • There is no preparation for this procedure, unless pediatric, and in that case see the ordering physician.

Myelogram (Images of Spinal Column) Preparation:

  • Nothing to eat or drink after midnight
  • Myelogram Prep

Disadvantages of X-Rays:

The main disadvantage is

  • Exposure to radiation